May 31, 2016

Painting With The Girls 152

May 31, 2016

Day 152 (214 days to go)

Panel 14-18

Please go to May 18, to purchase.

I am back and getting organized again. I tried to get things done as much as I could before I left for ten days. The eighteen-tile panel covered my work until June 4, and I have time to think before I get started. I will resume with another few days of art history, moving to contemporary art today and what it means to me. Seven months are left in 2016, and in the next couple of weeks, I will be thinking what I would like to do with the remaining year in terms of writing about creativity and art in my personal experience.

I hope you are having a fantastic spring and are being creative.

 

 

 

 

May 30, 2016

Painting With The Girls 151

May 30, 2016

Day 151 (215 days to go)

Panel 12-18

To purchase, please go to May 18, 2016.

 

May 29, 2016

painting With The Girls 150

May 29, 2016

Day 150 (216 days to go)

Panel 14

Set of 18 panels or prints may be purchased. Please go to May 18, 2016 to buy.

May 28, 2016

Painting With The Girls 149

May 28, 2016

Day 149 (217 days to go)

Watercolor Panel 5X7, watercolor

 

May 27, 2016

Painting With The Girls 148

May 27, 2016

Day 148 (218 days to go)

 

May 25, 2016

Painting With The Girls 146

May 25, 2016

Day 146 (220 days to go)

Watercolor Panel 5X7, watercolor

 

May 24, 2016

Painting With The Girls 145

May 24, 2016

Day 145 (221 days to go)

Watercolor Panel 5X7, watercolor

 

May 23, 2016

Painting With The Girls 144

May 23, 2016

Day 144 (222 days to go)

Watercolor Panel 5X7, watercolor

 

May 22, 2016

Painting With The Girls 143

May 22, 2016

Day 143 (223 days to go)

Watercolor Panel 5X7, watercolor

 

May 21, 2016

Painting With The Girls 142

May 21, 2016

Day 142 (224 days to go)

Watercolor Panel 5X7, watercolor

Mary Cassatt Part 7

As the new century rolled in, Mary Cassatt at age fifty-five realize that her art generation was in decline, as they made room for the Modernists who were gaining recognition.

In 1901 Mary was invited by her old friends the Havemeyers to come along with them to Italy and Spain and help them with her expertise to find old masters paintings for their art collection. Mary agreed and thought this would be a good opportunity to rekindle her close friendship with American friend Louisine Havemeyers.  The trip lasted about ten months and they were successful in finding old masters and purchasing El Greco’s that were obscured at the time. This great collection resides in the United Stated and Mary is remembered in Louisine’s memoirs that were published in 1930.

Upon her return, Mary went straight to work for an exhibit organized by Durand-Ruel in 1903 in New York. Her paintings show that Mary was inspired again by the old masters on her visit to Italy and Spain. Her subjects were richly dressed and they looked grand. Her next years were very productive.

As Mary reached her sixtieth birthday, she and her Brother Gardner’s family decided to take a long trip to Egypt. This trip was to take several months, but as they had just started, her brother became very ill. Nobody really new what was the cause of his ailment. Until he was taken away to proper care, Mary’s health also declined in this period. She went home and was diagnosed with untreated diabetes. She was unable to work for a long time until her health improved. She worked steadily in the mornings and occupied the rest of her day with friends such as Renoir who was her close neighbor.

Mary also was involved in donating her work to the suffrage cause in the USA through her friend Louisine Havemeyer. Because oh her own families lack of support back in the USA for the suffrages cause, Mary decided that she didn’t want to leave her paintings to Aleck’s family. She sold all the paintings she had at home and changed her will to benefit only Gardner’s’ children.  

In the last years of her life Mary suffered of rheumatism and cataracts that had to be treated with surgeries. She never painted again and died of complications of diabetes in January 14, 1926. 

 

 

May 20, 2016

Painting With The Girls 140

May 19, 2016

Day 140 (226 days to go)

Panel 2-18

Watercolor Panel 5X7, watercolor

 

May 19, 2016

Painting With The Girls 139

May 18, 2016

Day 139 (227 days to go)

Panel 1-18

Watercolor Panel 5X7, watercolor

The Modernist movement was inspired by the Industrial Revolution of its time. The Post Modernist movement combines, uses and is inspired by all forms explored in art. Post Modernists do not reject anything already explored. They used all art forms eclectically to come up with something new and creative. A good example of Post Modernist art is the image that Andy Warhol created of Marilyn Monroe. He took a media that already existed, in this case her image from a feature movie, and silkscreened it into a print, repeating her image several times. 

 

May 18, 2016

Painting With The Girls 139

May 18, 2016.

Day 139 (227 days to go)

 

Cherry Panel 9

Watercolor Panel 5X7, watercolor

May 17, 2016

Painting With The Girls 138

May 17, 2016.

Day 138 (228 days to go)

Cherry Panel 8

Watercolor Panel 5X7, watercolor

Andy Warhol (1925-1987) was an American painter and printmaker who was a leading figure in the Pop Art movement. His work reflected the new and growing culture of mass production and advertisement that emerged as he was exploring his role as an artist. He called his studio The Factory. In art he explored the relationship between celebrity culture, drugs, pornography and sex. He is well known for his prints that were done in silkscreen form. Most notable are Campbell Soup and his series of famous people, such as Marylyn Monroe and Elizabeth Taylor. He died in Manhattan at age 58 of complications of gallbladder surgery.

click here for gallery

May 16, 2016

Painting With The Girls 137

May 16, 2016

Day 137 (229 days to go)

Cherry Panel 7

Watercolor Panel 5X7, watercolor

 

 

Mark Rothkowitz (1903-1970) was an American painter labeled an Abstract Expressionist against his will.  He changed his name to Rothko in 1938, fearing anti-Semitism in America because of the growing Nazi influence in Europe. He is best known for painting two colored rectangles, such as Rust and Blue, sometimes with no edges between them. He was a successful painter in his time, and he created the paintings for the Rothko Chapel in Houston, Texas. He committed suicide in 1970, overdosing with antidepressants and slicing his wrists.

The Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C. created a special space for his work in 2010.

May 15, 2016

Painting With The Girls 136

May 15, 2016

Day 136 (130 days to go)

Cherry Panel 6

Watercolor Panel 5X7, watercolor

 

Willem de Kooning was a Dutch American Abstract Expressionist painter, who moved to New York in 1926. He was an avid reader of philosophy and literature, and is well known for his black and white paintings and the Woman series.

De Kooning’s female figures are an important milestone in the post-war, feminist movement, as well as a trademark of his work.  

May 14, 2016

Painting With The Girls 135

May 14, 2016

Day 135 (231 days to go)

Cherry Panel 5

Watercolor Panel 5X7, watercolor

Part VI

For the next decade Mary Cassatt had to deal with serious work issues and sickness and death in her family.

Lydia, her sister died in 1883. Mary had hardly the chance to overcome her loss when her parents’ health began to decline.

In 1886, the Impressionists had another exhibit. Mary participated in organizing and financing it along with Degas and Morisot. The sales were successful, and the critics praised Mary again.

Mary’s art dealer was also showing her work in New York, where Impressionist style paintings were in demand.

For the next few years, Mary managed her work while she cared for her parents. Her father’s health took a turn for the worse at the end of the decade, and he passed away in 1891.

Right after her father’s death, Mary Cassatt was invited to paint a mural for the woman’s building at the World’s Columbian Exposition held in Chicago in 1893. The Cassatts had been renting villas for the summer and Mary decided to paint this large commission at the Chateau of Bachilliers, where they had spent the previous summer. The studio was big enough to hold three very large canvases that together would form the mural called Modern Women. These paintings have not survived, but pictures of them show women picking together the fruit of knowledge from a tree. They have the simplicity of Mary’s prints, and the colors are vibrant.

Just as she finished that enormous project her first major exhibit in Paris opened. Almost one hundred works were installed at the Dur and Ruel Gallery for Mary’s retrospective exhibition.

Having kept herself so busy after her father’s death, Mary decided to slow down some and move away from Paris. After so many years of renting houses for the summer, Mary decided to buy a chateau in Beaufresne and renovate it. She kept an apartment in Paris, and she Mrs. Mathilde Vallet, their long time maid, running both places, so that Mary’s work was not interrupted. This marks the series of paintings done by the water featuring family members who came for visits from Philadelphia. She painted The Boating Party in 1894, a well-known painting depicting bright colors by the sea and a mother holding a child in a boat.

Mary’s mother died the following year, leaving Mary alone for the rest of her life.

Her success and sales in New York continued, and she decided it was time to return to her birthplace for a visit.

In 1898 Mary arrived in New York, after a very short visit to Philadelphia, to see her brother and grown children. She was warmly received in the art world, and her patrons immediately requested commissions to paint their children and family.

She also went to Boston to visit the Sears family who she had been acquainted with through work in Paris. They also commissioned a portrait of Mrs. Sarah Choate Sears, an artist herself, and collector.  This was a business trip to ensure her sales in New York, and after a few months away from Paris, she was ready to go back to her beloved home in Beaufresne.

 

 

May 13, 2016

Painting With The Girls 134

May 13, 2016

Day 134 (232 days to go)

 

Cherry Panel 4

Watercolor Panel 5X7, watercolor

Jackson Pollock (1912-1956) was an American painter who pioneered Abstract Expressionism. His paintings were created on the floor, and he walked around the canvas throwing or dripping paint. They didn’t represent or depict anything and the viewer could not relate to the painter’s intentions or title of the work.

He was an alcoholic who died in a car accident while under the influence at age 44.

 

 

 

May 12, 2016

Painting With The Girls 133

May 12, 2016

Day 133 (233 days to go)

 

Cherry Panel 3

Watercolor Panel 5X7, watercolor

Edward Hopper (1882-1967) was an American painter well known for his empty cities and gloomy characters.

Hopper’s portraits featured psychological traits to his characters, such as loneliness and emptiness in an urban setting. He was married to Josephine Hopper who was a painter herself, and she died ten months after him. She donated their joint collection of more than three thousand works to the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York.

 

May 11, 2016

Painting With The Girls 132

May 11, 2016

Day 132 (234 days to go)

 

Cherry Panel 2

Watercolor Panel 5X7, watercolor

Joan Miró (1893-1983) was a Spanish painter, sculptor and ceramist, who joined    the circle of Spaniards in Paris. Picasso was everyone’s inspiration in 1918, but Miró embraced Surrealism and adopted Automatism to explore his subconscious. His paintings look as writings, inspired by cave paintings and Spanish architecture. Miro’s images are humorous, colorful and animated.

During World War II, Miró moved permanently to Palma de Majorca, where he resided until his death of heart failure at age 90.